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    Studio Ghibli has announced Kaze Tachinu (The Wind Rises), the next—and possibly the last—feature film written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki. It is to be loosely based on the life of Jiro Horikoshi, aircraft designer from the first half of the 20th century, especially known for his design of the Mitsubishi A6M “Zero Fighter”, which was used by the Japanese Navy in World War II, and was a notable presence in the attack of Pearl Harbor.Considering Miyazaki’s consistent philosophy regarding the personal & global ramifications of war, and his painting-on-the-head-of-a-pin attention to detail when depicting the intricacies of individual characters, this should make for a very interesting story.It is said that the film will also feature the Great Kantō Earthquake of 1923, which may be used to speak on the events of 2011’s Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. Joe Hisaishi will provide the score.Kaze Tachinu will have a Summer 2013 release in Japan. via Ghibli Blog

    Studio Ghibli has announced Kaze Tachinu (The Wind Rises), the next—and possibly the last—feature film written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki. It is to be loosely based on the life of Jiro Horikoshi, aircraft designer from the first half of the 20th century, especially known for his design of the Mitsubishi A6M “Zero Fighter”, which was used by the Japanese Navy in World War II, and was a notable presence in the attack of Pearl Harbor.

    Considering Miyazaki’s consistent philosophy regarding the personal & global ramifications of war, and his painting-on-the-head-of-a-pin attention to detail when depicting the intricacies of individual characters, this should make for a very interesting story.

    It is said that the film will also feature the Great Kantō Earthquake of 1923, which may be used to speak on the events of 2011’s Tōhoku earthquake and tsunamiJoe Hisaishi will provide the score.

    Kaze Tachinu will have a Summer 2013 release in Japan. 

    via Ghibli Blog

    Comments (View)126 NotesDecember 20, 2012

    “I mean millions of people have decided that God doesn’t exist, or he’s irrelevant to me, and we have killed fifty-four million babies, and the institution of marriage is right on the verge of a complete redefinition. Believe me, that is going to have consequences too. 
“And a lot of these things are happening around us, and somebody is going to get mad at me for saying what I am about to say right now, but I am going to give you my honest opinion: I think we have turned our back on the Scripture and on God Almighty and I think he has allowed judgment to fall upon us. I think that’s what’s going on.”
—James Dobson, during his December 17 Family Talk with Dr. Dobson broadcast.
The superstition which Dobson touts here is as old as humanity itself; this notion that if we scramble around in just the right way, and find successful methods of appeasement (e.g. sending children up to the volcano’s peak as a sacrifice, like La Doncella—pictured above; immolating any suspected witches in town; convincing gays to stop being gay or wanting legally-recognized unions; etc.), that we can spare ourselves, our families, and our communities from the wrath of a sentient agency who purposefully directs earthquakes, demon possessions (read: mental illness, like that of Seung-Hui Cho), fires, and famines as a means to keep us in line. If this agency does not wish these disasters upon us, then certainly those mighty arms are folded in unappeased resignation, and while watching the approach of a decimating tsunami, lavaflow, or gunman towards the unsuspecting people, a heavenly voice declares “I’ll allow it.”
In spite of this, Dobson raises far more sound and reasoned concerns in his broadcast, such as the potential negative effects mild-to-major neglect has on children, especially during times of transition or stress. He contemplates how certain common traits among modern lifestyles could have an undesirable sociopsychological impact. Also, it is completely reasonable to posit that there are specific causal factors in the lives of mass murderers which could have been avoided; perhaps if families, guardians, acquaintances, or (obviously) the killers had made different choices within the series of events leading up to each terrible outburst, those outbursts would not have occurred. These are all difficult topics that warrant our attention. However, when Dobson’s thesis postulates that a refusal to obey God is to blame, allowing the “shields of the earth” to turn against a population undeserving of a blessed protection (in Sandy Hook’s case, a population mostly consisting of kindergarten children), it just reminds me how far we’ve come, and yet, how much further we still need to go. Regardless of our foundational theology, or lack thereof, we must continue sifting the reason from the superstition, lest we continue to shake our talismans at a threatening sky.
If only I had worn my lucky scarf today. If only I had turned the handle three times before passing through that door. If only I would have prayed harder for my son this morning. If only I wasn’t a Scorpio with all my planets in the eighth house. If only I had visited the confessional before taking communion. If only the women in my family were fully obedient and knew their place. If only we had burned that witch before she had cast her evil eye on our crops. If only we would have sent a more pure child to die in the smoldering crevasse.
If only things were just like they used to be, Doncella.

    I mean millions of people have decided that God doesn’t exist, or he’s irrelevant to me, and we have killed fifty-four million babies, and the institution of marriage is right on the verge of a complete redefinition. Believe me, that is going to have consequences too. 

    “And a lot of these things are happening around us, and somebody is going to get mad at me for saying what I am about to say right now, but I am going to give you my honest opinion: I think we have turned our back on the Scripture and on God Almighty and I think he has allowed judgment to fall upon us. I think that’s what’s going on.”

    —James Dobson, during his December 17 Family Talk with Dr. Dobson broadcast.

    The superstition which Dobson touts here is as old as humanity itself; this notion that if we scramble around in just the right way, and find successful methods of appeasement (e.g. sending children up to the volcano’s peak as a sacrifice, like La Doncella—pictured above; immolating any suspected witches in town; convincing gays to stop being gay or wanting legally-recognized unions; etc.), that we can spare ourselves, our families, and our communities from the wrath of a sentient agency who purposefully directs earthquakes, demon possessions (read: mental illness, like that of Seung-Hui Cho), fires, and famines as a means to keep us in line. If this agency does not wish these disasters upon us, then certainly those mighty arms are folded in unappeased resignation, and while watching the approach of a decimating tsunami, lavaflow, or gunman towards the unsuspecting people, a heavenly voice declares “I’ll allow it.”

    In spite of this, Dobson raises far more sound and reasoned concerns in his broadcast, such as the potential negative effects mild-to-major neglect has on children, especially during times of transition or stress. He contemplates how certain common traits among modern lifestyles could have an undesirable sociopsychological impact. Also, it is completely reasonable to posit that there are specific causal factors in the lives of mass murderers which could have been avoided; perhaps if families, guardians, acquaintances, or (obviously) the killers had made different choices within the series of events leading up to each terrible outburst, those outbursts would not have occurred. These are all difficult topics that warrant our attention. However, when Dobson’s thesis postulates that a refusal to obey God is to blame, allowing the “shields of the earth” to turn against a population undeserving of a blessed protection (in Sandy Hook’s case, a population mostly consisting of kindergarten children), it just reminds me how far we’ve come, and yet, how much further we still need to go. Regardless of our foundational theology, or lack thereof, we must continue sifting the reason from the superstition, lest we continue to shake our talismans at a threatening sky.

    If only I had worn my lucky scarf today. If only I had turned the handle three times before passing through that door. If only I would have prayed harder for my son this morning. If only I wasn’t a Scorpio with all my planets in the eighth house. If only I had visited the confessional before taking communion. If only the women in my family were fully obedient and knew their place. If only we had burned that witch before she had cast her evil eye on our crops. If only we would have sent a more pure child to die in the smoldering crevasse.

    If only things were just like they used to be, Doncella.

    Comments (View)23 NotesDecember 18, 2012

    My deepest and sincerest condolences to the families and friends of those lost in the Sandy Hook Shooting.
When a 20-year-old man steps into an elementary school, murdering 26 people (including 20 young children just 6 or 7 years old), only to then take his own life, those of us outside his nervous system are left bewildered as to why such a thing happened. The brain is a complex and isolated thing, and that isolation is only amplified by the apparent psychopathy necessary to commit such acts. In spite of the current speculations of motive, we can conclude from our understanding of neurology that, upon that island of grey matter in the skull, the shooter was receiving a rewarding and validating surge of neurochemicals with every shell discharged. Such an abominable realization as this only disturbs our comprehension further, inflaming our emotions, and appropriately so. My own insides churn and my eyes well when I visualize the appalling events of Friday the 14th.
That said, my wish, as this situation crystallizes, is that we can all avoid hyperbole, cynicism, hasty generalizations, false dichotomies, and media fatigue, and genuinely study what happened in Connecticut with reason, patience, and humility. The media organizations who are inundating you with unverified suppositions will not do this for you. The internet commenters who are either trolling or legitimizing your own white-hot emotions & opinions will not do this for you. Your loved ones and your worst enemies will not do this for you. This is your responsibility, and yours alone.
We are averaging one or two mass shootings per year in the United States. Our nation is very large, of course, by both geography and population. In light of these facts, it is reasonable to conclude that there are those in our population, however few, who are currently preparing and planning (or at the very least, seriously humoring the notion of initiating) the next massacre in our country. The statistics tell us that we will most likely see the results of this dark contemplation within the next eight months. This is an alarming problem with shockingly grisly consequences, and action needs to be taken.
Regardless of the motives behind the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary, or the motives behind those previous or yet to come, we can conclude this: 
Yes, this is a social issue. 
Yes, this is a mental health issue. 
Yes, this is a national security issue. 
This overlapping knot of causality and pertinent variables requires that those of us left alive must communicate about uncomfortable things. We will need to rethink many pacifying details in our society which we are clutching dearly to our chests. We will need to question some of our familiar comforts and privileges for the good of this continent-wide cooperative that we call the United States of America.
We can clearly see just how much a single (and often unassuming) individual can impact our communities for the worse; it is disturbing, without question. 1 percent of the general population (and up to 25 percent of the prison population) lives with psychopathic neurology. Even with our contemporary understanding of the brain, we are unable to cure everyone who is as psychologically anomalistic as to commit such atrocities as these. Likewise, no single one of us can purge our own physiology of the raging, reactionary primate programmed within us, and it may seem hopeless to many to even consider the possibility of making society better when each and every one of our minds is locked up by our genes, constructed to be both enlightened and irrational; both lovehungered and bloodthirsty. By and large, we as a species are learning better ways to quiet that beast within, but what of the others? What about that small percentage of people whose psychopathy, when offered the necessary catalysts, unravels into disastrous, hideous expression? This clear connection between the protection of the normative population and the improved metal health and well being of high-risk individuals must be clearly admitted and understood. Rarely is the maxim “help others to help yourself” made so tangible.
Something obviously lies amiss between us and our ideals in the scope of human well being; something that has plagued us for at least as long as we have been recording the social successes and failures of our species. As humanity, we find ourselves in a position where we can step outside this animal skin and contemplate our own limitations as a mortal creature, seeking intricate solutions beyond our own biological functions. We found our legs to be inefficient for traveling long distances in short periods, so we rode horses, and then we built automobiles. We needed to calculate time-consuming and complicated problems, so we created the abacus, and then computers. We could not read each others’ minds, so we developed language. We could not pass along our memories or experiences to the generations to come, so we have written to them. We are toolmakers. We have a long history of acknowledging our shortcomings, and devising the means to overcome these limited abilities. The advance of society is no different. 
Civilization never evolves as quickly as we would like, but it is crises like these which should propel us forward. If we are to see, in our lifetime, even a single year pass without a mass shooting within our United States, we must assess our current privileges and question our current dispensation of financial resources and social services. I feel that we owe it to those who have paid for our hesitations in blood, and more importantly, to those still alive whom we can still save.
This is not a polarized manifesto, nor a call for a police state, nor a desire for anything even remotely Orwellian. This is not an appeal to the sensationalistic low-hanging fruit that infests so much of our discourse. However, the status quo should indeed be rationally audited, critically challenged, and most certainly revised, and it will take those of us who are reasonable and patient to do it. We will lose many capable people over the next week to the excuse of media burnout, so we must remain steadfast in the face of that familiar exhaustion of bad news. The duty remains with those who accept the responsibility to improve the health of our cooperative. We must remember that we are facing yet another limitation of our humanity, and that we, the toolmakers, can overcome it. What we cannot replace in our own minds, our own bodies, and our own physiology, we can augment and improve with a tempered evolution in our methods of pedagogy & andragogy; in healthcare and the availability of it; and in matured communal rules and social services which can obstruct the heinous intentions of those who are psychologically volatile, and further protect those of us not willing to murder simply to achieve a fleeting neurochemical solace within our skulls.
Sign a formal White House Petition to Immediately address the issue of gun control through the introduction of legislation in Congress 
Find Your Representative
Find a Therapist or Treatment Center

    My deepest and sincerest condolences to the families and friends of those lost in the Sandy Hook Shooting.

    When a 20-year-old man steps into an elementary school, murdering 26 people (including 20 young children just 6 or 7 years old), only to then take his own life, those of us outside his nervous system are left bewildered as to why such a thing happened. The brain is a complex and isolated thing, and that isolation is only amplified by the apparent psychopathy necessary to commit such acts. In spite of the current speculations of motive, we can conclude from our understanding of neurology that, upon that island of grey matter in the skull, the shooter was receiving a rewarding and validating surge of neurochemicals with every shell discharged. Such an abominable realization as this only disturbs our comprehension further, inflaming our emotions, and appropriately so. My own insides churn and my eyes well when I visualize the appalling events of Friday the 14th.

    That said, my wish, as this situation crystallizes, is that we can all avoid hyperbole, cynicism, hasty generalizations, false dichotomies, and media fatigue, and genuinely study what happened in Connecticut with reason, patience, and humility. The media organizations who are inundating you with unverified suppositions will not do this for you. The internet commenters who are either trolling or legitimizing your own white-hot emotions & opinions will not do this for you. Your loved ones and your worst enemies will not do this for you. This is your responsibility, and yours alone.

    We are averaging one or two mass shootings per year in the United States. Our nation is very large, of course, by both geography and population. In light of these facts, it is reasonable to conclude that there are those in our population, however few, who are currently preparing and planning (or at the very least, seriously humoring the notion of initiating) the next massacre in our country. The statistics tell us that we will most likely see the results of this dark contemplation within the next eight months. This is an alarming problem with shockingly grisly consequences, and action needs to be taken.

    Regardless of the motives behind the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary, or the motives behind those previous or yet to come, we can conclude this: 

    Yes, this is a social issue. 

    Yes, this is a mental health issue. 

    Yes, this is a national security issue. 

    This overlapping knot of causality and pertinent variables requires that those of us left alive must communicate about uncomfortable things. We will need to rethink many pacifying details in our society which we are clutching dearly to our chests. We will need to question some of our familiar comforts and privileges for the good of this continent-wide cooperative that we call the United States of America.

    We can clearly see just how much a single (and often unassuming) individual can impact our communities for the worse; it is disturbing, without question. 1 percent of the general population (and up to 25 percent of the prison population) lives with psychopathic neurology. Even with our contemporary understanding of the brain, we are unable to cure everyone who is as psychologically anomalistic as to commit such atrocities as these. Likewise, no single one of us can purge our own physiology of the raging, reactionary primate programmed within us, and it may seem hopeless to many to even consider the possibility of making society better when each and every one of our minds is locked up by our genes, constructed to be both enlightened and irrational; both lovehungered and bloodthirsty. By and large, we as a species are learning better ways to quiet that beast within, but what of the others? What about that small percentage of people whose psychopathy, when offered the necessary catalysts, unravels into disastrous, hideous expression? This clear connection between the protection of the normative population and the improved metal health and well being of high-risk individuals must be clearly admitted and understood. Rarely is the maxim “help others to help yourself” made so tangible.

    Something obviously lies amiss between us and our ideals in the scope of human well being; something that has plagued us for at least as long as we have been recording the social successes and failures of our species. As humanity, we find ourselves in a position where we can step outside this animal skin and contemplate our own limitations as a mortal creature, seeking intricate solutions beyond our own biological functions. We found our legs to be inefficient for traveling long distances in short periods, so we rode horses, and then we built automobiles. We needed to calculate time-consuming and complicated problems, so we created the abacus, and then computers. We could not read each others’ minds, so we developed language. We could not pass along our memories or experiences to the generations to come, so we have written to them. We are toolmakers. We have a long history of acknowledging our shortcomings, and devising the means to overcome these limited abilities. The advance of society is no different. 

    Civilization never evolves as quickly as we would like, but it is crises like these which should propel us forward. If we are to see, in our lifetime, even a single year pass without a mass shooting within our United States, we must assess our current privileges and question our current dispensation of financial resources and social services. I feel that we owe it to those who have paid for our hesitations in blood, and more importantly, to those still alive whom we can still save.

    This is not a polarized manifesto, nor a call for a police state, nor a desire for anything even remotely Orwellian. This is not an appeal to the sensationalistic low-hanging fruit that infests so much of our discourse. However, the status quo should indeed be rationally audited, critically challenged, and most certainly revised, and it will take those of us who are reasonable and patient to do it. We will lose many capable people over the next week to the excuse of media burnout, so we must remain steadfast in the face of that familiar exhaustion of bad news. The duty remains with those who accept the responsibility to improve the health of our cooperative. We must remember that we are facing yet another limitation of our humanity, and that we, the toolmakers, can overcome it. What we cannot replace in our own minds, our own bodies, and our own physiology, we can augment and improve with a tempered evolution in our methods of pedagogy & andragogy; in healthcare and the availability of it; and in matured communal rules and social services which can obstruct the heinous intentions of those who are psychologically volatile, and further protect those of us not willing to murder simply to achieve a fleeting neurochemical solace within our skulls.

    Sign a formal White House Petition to Immediately address the issue of gun control through the introduction of legislation in Congress 

    Find Your Representative

    Find a Therapist or Treatment Center

    Comments (View)23 NotesDecember 15, 2012

    It’s been a while since I’ve checked in. I hope that you are all having a great December.The last twelve months have been a period of introspection and focus on purpose, family, personhood, and growth. Now that I’m starting to get myself back on the grid again, I thought I would rev the blog back up with a new buyable print of my own, A Home in Repose. Available through Society6, the work comes in a variety of sizes and forms, including gallery-quality Giclée prints (both framed and unframed), minis, canvas, and stationary cards. I hope that you like them.Thanks for following along here. I’ll be giving the blog an overhaul shortly and getting things back up and running again. In the meantime, enjoy the holidays.—Joe

    It’s been a while since I’ve checked in. I hope that you are all having a great December.

    The last twelve months have been a period of introspection and focus on purpose, family, personhood, and growth. Now that I’m starting to get myself back on the grid again, I thought I would rev the blog back up with a new buyable print of my own, A Home in Repose

    Available through Society6, the work comes in a variety of sizes and forms, including gallery-quality Giclée prints (both framed and unframed), minis, canvas, and stationary cards. I hope that you like them.

    Thanks for following along here. I’ll be giving the blog an overhaul shortly and getting things back up and running again. In the meantime, enjoy the holidays.

    —Joe

    Comments (View)14 NotesDecember 11, 2012

    I love this fantastical illustration work done for the Vimeo home & login pages, by NYC artist Ian Higginbotham.

    I love this fantastical illustration work done for the Vimeo home & login pages, by NYC artist Ian Higginbotham.

    Comments (View)159 NotesApril 13, 2012

    German furniture designer Florian Saul has developed the elegantly muted Servus clothing rack. Servus (Latin for servant) leans gracefully against a wall, carrying a leather bag to accommodate scarves, gloves, and other small items. If the need arises, two frames can be joined for twice the capacity (I assume that they are secured together, rather than just leaning against one another). via NOTCOT

    Comments (View)67 NotesApril 11, 2012

    Remember the QLOCKTWO typographic clock by Biegert & Funk from almost three years ago? There is now a desktop/alarm incarnation, as well as a new wristwatch edition, which will be available Autumn 2012.
via NOTCOT

    Remember the QLOCKTWO typographic clock by Biegert & Funk from almost three years ago? There is now a desktop/alarm incarnation, as well as a new wristwatch edition, which will be available Autumn 2012.

    via NOTCOT

    Comments (View)421 NotesApril 11, 2012

    Caine’s Arcade is a short film about Caine Monroy, a 9-year-old boy who, while spending his summer vacation at his father’s used auto parts shop in East LA, cleverly built an assortment of cardboard arcade games for store customers to play. Caine’s first eventual customer was filmmaker Nirvan Mullick, who (along with Caine’s father) decided that the boy’s ingenious summer venture deserved more attention. The result was Mullick organizing a flashmob event which had the arcade teeming with customers, all eager to partake in Caine’s cardboard vision. 

    The short film premiered at the DIY Days event in October 2011. You can donate to Caine’s scholarship fund through the film’s site.

    Heard through John Schroter

    Comments (View)47 NotesApril 10, 2012

    Lavatory Self-Portraits in the Flemish Style, by American artist Nina Katchadourian, from her Seat Assignment series. This is the kind of impulsive play that keeps us cognitively limber: seeing the unorthodox connections between objects, people, situations, and abstractions, no matter where you are, or how dull your surroundings. 
As explained by the artist:
While in the lavatory on a domestic flight in March 2010, I spontaneously put a tissue paper toilet cover seat cover over my head and took a picture in the mirror. The image evoked 15th-century Flemish portraiture. I decided to add more images made in this mode and planned to take advantage of a long-haul flight from San Francisco to Auckland, guessing that there were likely to be long periods of time when no one was using the lavatory on the 14-hour flight. I made several forays to the bathroom from my aisle seat, and by the time we landed I had a large group of new photographs entitled Lavatory Self-Portraits in the Flemish Style. I was wearing a thin black scarf that I sometimes hung up on the wall behind me to create the deep black ground that is typical of these portraits. There is no special illumination in use other than the lavatory’s own lights and all the images are shot hand-held with the camera phone. At the Dunedin Public Art Gallery, the photos were framed in faux-historical frames and hung on a deep red wall reminiscent of the painting galleries in museums like the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 
via @BibliOdyssey


    Lavatory Self-Portraits in the Flemish Style, by American artist Nina Katchadourian, from her Seat Assignment series. This is the kind of impulsive play that keeps us cognitively limber: seeing the unorthodox connections between objects, people, situations, and abstractions, no matter where you are, or how dull your surroundings. 

    As explained by the artist:

    While in the lavatory on a domestic flight in March 2010, I spontaneously put a tissue paper toilet cover seat cover over my head and took a picture in the mirror. The image evoked 15th-century Flemish portraiture. I decided to add more images made in this mode and planned to take advantage of a long-haul flight from San Francisco to Auckland, guessing that there were likely to be long periods of time when no one was using the lavatory on the 14-hour flight. I made several forays to the bathroom from my aisle seat, and by the time we landed I had a large group of new photographs entitled Lavatory Self-Portraits in the Flemish Style. I was wearing a thin black scarf that I sometimes hung up on the wall behind me to create the deep black ground that is typical of these portraits. There is no special illumination in use other than the lavatory’s own lights and all the images are shot hand-held with the camera phone. At the Dunedin Public Art Gallery, the photos were framed in faux-historical frames and hung on a deep red wall reminiscent of the painting galleries in museums like the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

    via @BibliOdyssey

    Comments (View)48 NotesApril 6, 2012

    Filmmaker Jeff Desom has meticulously stitched together scenes from Hitchcock’s Rear Window to make a virtually seamless, tilt-shifted collage of events as seen from L. B. Jeffries’ apartment. The end result is a twenty-minute long “single take” loop (which has been sped up in the making-of video above) of all the goings on of Jeffries’ neighbors, which almost feels like something equally Will Wright as it is Alfred Hitchcock.

    via yewknee’d, Will Jardine

    Comments (View)50 NotesApril 3, 2012